About the Guardianship Council

In 1995, the Netherlands signed the International Convention on the Rights of the Child. The underlying principle is that a child needs special care and protection due to there vulnerable and dependent position.

The role of the CN Guardianship Council

Naturally responsibility lies first and foremost with the parents themselves. They have to take care of and raise their child and stimulate his/her development. When parents do (can) not assume their responsibility, this can endanger the child’s development. In that case, the Guardianship Council, as part of the Ministry of Justice and Security, has the duty to protect children.

The Guardianship Council is consulted or brought in if there are serious concerns about the circumstances in which children between the ages of 0 and 18 years are growing up and being raised. The Guardianship Council stands up for these children by investigating their (family) situation and advising on the best solution for the child. The best interests of the child are at the centre of everything the Guardianship Council does.

Parents raise their children. That is their right and their duty. But sometimes a child’s development can be seriously jeopardised because parents are unable to take on their responsibility or because voluntary assistance stagnates or isn’t possible. Then the Guardianship Council is brought in and performs it's legal duty. The Guardianship Council contributes to the safety and security of children and the future prospects of young people.

In addition, at the request of the Court, the Guardianship Council also plays a role with parents who separate and cannot agree about arrangements for their children. The Guardianship Council also investigates the circumstances of children who get in trouble with the police and the Council advises on an appropriate punishment.  The Guardianship Council is also involved when children are given up for adoption or adopted. The Guardianship Council can be directly brought in by a limited number of bodies such as judicial authorities (including the Public Prosecutor’s Office and the Police) and support/aid agencies such as the Caribbean Netherlands Youth Care and Family Supervision and Mental Health Caribbean.  

Only if there is an acute and threatening situation for the child can other authorities and individuals contact the Guardianship Council directly.