Long-term care

Long-term care includes:

  • Personal care, nursing or assistance at the home of an insured person
  • Admittance or continued stay in a nursing home, a convalescent home, or an establishment for the handicapped
  • Heel prick screening and any treatment required

For reimbursement of long-term care, the care provider must request prior permission from the ZVK. In urgent cases, permission may be requested afterwards. 

Homecare

The care of an insured person at home is provided by a homecare organization, a nursing home, a convalescent home, or an establishment for the handicapped that is appointed by the ZVK.

Accommodations in an establishment

Admittance or continued stay in an establishment is intended for insured persons who require a protected environment, therapeutic living conditions, or permanent supervision. If an insured person with a somatic or psychogeriatric condition is staying in an establishment, and the spouse is entitled to stay in that same establishment.

Care involving an interpreter for the deaf

Care involving an interpreter for the deaf is care by an interpreter when conducting a conversation in living conditions. The duration of this care is a maximum of 30 hours per calendar year. For insured persons who are deaf-blind, the care involving an interpreter for the deaf is a maximum of 168 hours per calendar year. The care is only reimbursed if there is an interpreter for the deaf employed on your island and the care takes at least 30 minutes.

Palliative terminal care

Palliative care focuses on persons who are no longer able to heal. The objective is to maintain the quality of life and, where possible, to improve it. For insured persons who require palliative terminal care, the healthcare insurance reimburses accommodations, nursing and care in a hospice. For reimbursement of palliative terminal care, the care provider must request prior permission from the ZVK.

Heel prick screening

As from 1 January 2015, the national vaccination programme has been expanded to include the heel prick screening. Because of this screening, certain rare diseases can be detected early, so that your child can be given the correct treatment as soon as possible. The heel prick is done shortly after birth. The blood is screened for 18 conditions.

The heel prick screening has been phased in and has now been started on Bonaire. For Sint Eustatius and Saba, more preparation time is needed. Your physician can provide you with information about the heel prick.